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Israel using AI to identify human targets raising fears that innocents are being caught in the net

šŸŒˆ Abstract

The article discusses the use of AI-powered targeting systems by the Israeli military, raising concerns about the potential for misidentification and harm to innocent civilians. It examines two specific systems, "Lavender" and "Where's Daddy?", which automate the process of identifying and tracking targets. The article also explores broader trends in military AI, such as the prioritization of speed and lethality, and the implications for human agency and responsibility.

šŸ™‹ Q&A

[01] Israel using AI to identify human targets

1. What are the two AI-powered targeting systems discussed in the article?

  • The article discusses two technologies:
    • "Lavender": An AI recommendation system designed to use algorithms to identify Hamas operatives as targets
    • "Where's Daddy?": A system that tracks targets geographically so they can be followed into their family residences before being attacked

2. What are the concerns raised about these AI targeting systems?

  • The article suggests that these systems have led to the "dispassionate annihilation of thousands of eligibleā€”and ineligibleā€”targets at speed and without much human oversight."
  • There are concerns about the accuracy and potential biases in the training data used to profile targets, as well as the automation bias that can lead to over-reliance on the system's recommendations.

3. How do these AI systems accelerate the "kill chain" and make the process of killing more autonomous?

  • The article explains that these systems automate the "find-fix-track-target" components of the "kill chain", allowing for faster identification and targeting of individuals.
  • This reduces human oversight and responsibility, as the human operator is "deeply embedded in digital logics that are difficult to contest."

[02] Broader trends in military AI

1. What are some of the broader trends in military AI discussed in the article?

  • The article discusses the trend of military AI programs around the world striving to "shorten what the US military calls the 'sensor-to-shooter timeline' and 'increase lethality' in their operations."
  • It cites the example of the latest version of Project Maven, a US Department of Defense AI program, which has evolved from a sensor data analysis program to a full-blown AI-enabled target recommendation system.

2. How does the prioritization of speed and lethality in military AI impact human agency and responsibility?

  • The article suggests that the prioritization of speed and lethality in military AI "marginalizes the scope for human agency" and "removes the human sense of responsibility for computer-produced outcomes."
  • It argues that the "logic of the system requires this, owing to the comparatively slow cognitive systems of the human" and that "when AI, machine learning and human reasoning form a tight ecosystem, the capacity for human control is limited."

3. What are the ethical concerns raised about the use of AI in military targeting systems?

  • The article raises concerns about the training data, biases, accuracy, error rates, and automation bias in these AI systems.
  • It suggests that the "logic of the system requires this, owing to the comparatively slow cognitive systems of the human" and that "when AI, machine learning and human reasoning form a tight ecosystem, the capacity for human control is limited."
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